Tag Archives: wisdom

Best Books To Help Parents With Tech Mentoring, Nature Guidance, and Self-Care

Parents want to raise well-rounded kids who are comfortable in their own skin and with navigating in the natural and digital worlds. These advice books help parents and other care-givers to achieve that goal or to care for themselves in the process.

screenwise-coverThe sensible guide to raising digital citizens we’ve all been waiting for, Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World finally gets how kids use technology and how parents can support their efforts.

Author Devorah Heitner is thoroughly respectful of both sides of the equation and never talks down to, judges, or belittles anyone. Her book is chock-full of practical use-‘em-now tips and she gently instructs and builds the confidence of kids’ first and best digital mentors: their parents. This book doesn’t just skim the surface, it gets gritty and granular, supplying the words and tools we all need.

Among Heitner’s most important points:

  • Choose mentoring your child over simply monitoring what they do online.
  • Have clear, consistent boundaries and explain them to your kids.
  • Pay attention when your kids need you, or as Heitner says, “Be here now.”  Why that’s absolutely crucial.

balanced-and-barefootAnother must-read, Balanced and Barefoot: How Unrestricted Outdoor Play Makes for Strong, Confident, and Capable Children supplements Screenwise by  Continue reading

Pediatricians Take Surprising Stand on Kids and Screens

Two teenagers on cellphones

At long last, the American Academy of Pediatrics has revised its ideas for how kids should interact with screens. There are some surprises, especially that the guidelines cover much more than media.

Babies and little, little kids are still not supposed to watch any screen-based content, with one exception: Continue reading

When the Maasai Picked Up the Phone

I’ve written before about Wisdom 2.0, the conference that bills itself as “addressing the great challenge of our age: to not only live connected to one another through technology, but to do so in ways that are beneficial to our own well-being, effective in our work, and useful to the world.”

This year while I was there, I was lucky to get to know innovative yoga instructor and author, Elise Marie Collins. Over the days, we talked about what would have happened if we’d known ahead of time the consequences that spending so much time with personal digital technology would have on our minds and bodies. Continue reading